Sherwood Anderson And Other Famous Creoles

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Sherwood Anderson and Other Famous Creoles

Author : William Spratling
Publisher : Unknown
Page : 0 pages
File Size : 53,9 Mb
Release : 1968
Category : Electronic
ISBN : 0598854355

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Sherwood Anderson and Other Famous Creoles by William Spratling Pdf

Sherwood Anderson and Other Famous Creoles

Author : William Spratling,William Faulkner
Publisher : University of Texas Press
Page : 80 pages
File Size : 45,5 Mb
Release : 2014-07-03
Category : Art
ISBN : 9781477300381

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Sherwood Anderson and Other Famous Creoles by William Spratling,William Faulkner Pdf

"When Bill Faulkner came to New Orleans he was a skinny little guy, three years older than I, and was not taken very seriously except by a few of us." Thus the late William Spratling, popularly known as the Taxco "Silver King," recalled the mid-1920's, when Faulkner, a young man fresh from Oxford, Mississippi, roomed with Spratling in Pirates Alley. "By the time I would be up, say at seven, Bill would already be out on the little balcony over the garden tapping away on his portable, an invariable glass of alcohol-and-water at hand." A result of their friendship was a book depicting "various people who were then engaged … with the arts in New Orleans." It was based on firsthand observation. "There were casual parties with wonderful conversation and with plenty of grand, or later to be grand, people." Some of the names, in addition to Sherwood Anderson, were Horace Liveright, Carl Van Doren, Carl Sandberg, John Dos Passos, Anita Loos, and Oliver La Farge. Spratling supplied sharp caricatures of the people and Faulkner contributed succinct captions and a Foreword. It was all "sort of a private joke," but the four hundred copies were sold within a week and the original edition is now a collector's item. This book is a charming reminder of exciting days and talented people.

Sherwood Anderson and Other Famous Creoles

Author : William Spratling,William Faulkner
Publisher : Unknown
Page : 80 pages
File Size : 55,8 Mb
Release : 2012
Category : Caricatures and cartoons
ISBN : OCLC:1117276660

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Sherwood Anderson and Other Famous Creoles by William Spratling,William Faulkner Pdf

Sherwood Anderson and Other Famous Creoles

Author : William Spratling,William Faulkner
Publisher : University of Texas Press
Page : 80 pages
File Size : 51,6 Mb
Release : 1966
Category : Caricatures and cartoons
ISBN : 0292736967

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Sherwood Anderson and Other Famous Creoles by William Spratling,William Faulkner Pdf

Sherwood Anderson and Other Famous Creoles

Author : William Spratling,William Faulkner,Robert David Duncan
Publisher : Unknown
Page : 74 pages
File Size : 41,9 Mb
Release : 2013-10
Category : Electronic
ISBN : 1258995727

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Sherwood Anderson and Other Famous Creoles by William Spratling,William Faulkner,Robert David Duncan Pdf

This is a new release of the original 1926 edition.

Sherwood Anderson & Other Famous Creoles

Author : William Spratling,William Faulkner
Publisher : Unknown
Page : 50 pages
File Size : 47,9 Mb
Release : 1926
Category : Caricatures and cartoons
ISBN : LCCN:27027564

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Sherwood Anderson & Other Famous Creoles by William Spratling,William Faulkner Pdf

American Cultural Rebels

Author : Roy Kotynek,John Cohassey
Publisher : McFarland
Page : 263 pages
File Size : 51,6 Mb
Release : 2008-03-03
Category : History
ISBN : 9780786437092

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American Cultural Rebels by Roy Kotynek,John Cohassey Pdf

Artistic vanguards plot new aesthetic movements, print controversial magazines, hold provocative art shows, and stage experimental theatrical and musical performances. These revolutionaries have often helped create America's countercultural movements, from the early romantics and bohemians to the beatniks and hippies. This work looks at how experimental art and the avant-garde artists' lifestyles have influenced, and at times transformed, American culture since the mid-nineteenth century. The work will introduce readers to these artists and rebels, making a careful distinction between the worlds of the high modern artist (salons and galleries) and the bohemian.

Faulkner and His Contemporaries

Author : Joseph R. Urgo,Ann J. Abadie
Publisher : Univ. Press of Mississippi
Page : 195 pages
File Size : 50,5 Mb
Release : 2009-09-18
Category : Literary Collections
ISBN : 9781604730586

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Faulkner and His Contemporaries by Joseph R. Urgo,Ann J. Abadie Pdf

Although he spent the bulk of his life in Oxford, Mississippi-far removed from the intellectual centers of modernism and the writers who created it-William Faulkner (1897-1962) proved to be one of the American novelists who most comprehensively grasped modernism. In his fiction he tested its tenets in the most startling and insightful ways. What, then, did such contemporaries as Ernest Hemingway, Eudora Welty, and Walker Evans think of his work? How did his times affect and accept what he wrote? Faulkner and His Contemporaries explores the relationship between the Nobel laureate, ensconced in his "postage stamp of native soil," and the world of letters within which he created his masterpieces. In this anthology, essays focus on such topics as how Faulkner's literary antecedents (in particular, Willa Cather and Joseph Conrad) influenced his writing, his literary/aesthetic feud with rival Ernest Hemingway, and the common themes he shares with fellow southerners Welty and Evans. Several essays examine the environment in which Faulkner worked. Deborah Clarke concentrates on the rise of the automobile industry. W. Kenneth Holditch shows how the city of New Orleans acted as a major force in Faulkner's fiction, and Grace Elizabeth Hale examines how the civil rights era of Faulkner's later career compelled him to deal with his ideas about race and rebellion in new ways.

Sherwood Anderson and Other Famous Creoles

Author : William Spratling,William Faulkner
Publisher : Open Road Media
Page : 82 pages
File Size : 49,6 Mb
Release : 2022-01-01
Category : Biography & Autobiography
ISBN : 9781504068154

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Sherwood Anderson and Other Famous Creoles by William Spratling,William Faulkner Pdf

A treasury of literary history featuring caricatures of bohemian life in 1920s New Orleans with captions by William Faulkner. After meeting in the French Quarter, Nobel Prize–winning novelist William Faulkner and renowned silver artist William Spratling shared a house together—and collaborated on a parody volume that offered a witty portrait of the creative denizens of the city, a group that included such future icons as publisher and Broadway producer Horace Liveright, Pulitzer-winning biographer Carl Van Doren,; novelist John Dos Passos, actress and screenwriter Anita Loos, and others. This unique book provides both an enjoyable glimpse into the early lives of prominent literary and artistic figures and a snapshot of New Orleans history.

Natalie Scott

Author : Scott, John W.
Publisher : Pelican Publishing
Page : 504 pages
File Size : 54,5 Mb
Release : 2008
Category : Journalists
ISBN : 1455609218

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Natalie Scott by Scott, John W. Pdf

Dixie Bohemia

Author : John Shelton Reed
Publisher : LSU Press
Page : 346 pages
File Size : 41,8 Mb
Release : 2012-09-17
Category : History
ISBN : 9780807147665

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Dixie Bohemia by John Shelton Reed Pdf

In the years following World War I, the New Orleans French Quarter attracted artists and writers with its low rents, faded charm, and colorful street life. By the 1920s Jackson Square had become the center of a vibrant if short-lived bohemia. A young William Faulkner and his roommate William Spratling, an artist who taught at Tulane University, resided among the "artful and crafty ones of the French Quarter." In Dixie Bohemia John Shelton Reed introduces Faulkner's circle of friends -- ranging from the distinguished Sherwood Anderson to a gender-bending Mardi Gras costume designer -- and brings to life the people and places of New Orleans in the Jazz Age. Reed begins with Faulkner and Spratling's self-published homage to their fellow bohemians, "Sherwood Anderson and Other Famous Creoles." The book contained 43 sketches of New Orleans artists, by Spratling, with captions and a short introduction by Faulkner. The title served as a rather obscure joke: Sherwood was not a Creole and neither were most of the people featured. But with Reed's commentary, these profiles serve as an entry into the world of artists and writers that dined on Decatur Street, attended masked balls, and blatantly ignored the Prohibition Act. These men and women also helped to establish New Orleans institutions such as the Double Dealer literary magazine, the Arts and Crafts Club, and Le Petit Theatre. But unlike most bohemias, the one in New Orleans existed as a whites-only affair. Though some of the bohemians were relatively progressive, and many employed African American material in their own work, few of them knew or cared about what was going on across town among the city's black intellectuals and artists. The positive developments from this French Quarter renaissance, however, attracted attention and visitors, inspiring the historic preservation and commercial revitalization that turned the area into a tourist destination. Predictably, this gentrification drove out many of the working artists and writers who had helped revive the area. As Reed points out, one resident who identified herself as an "artist" on the 1920 federal census gave her occupation in 1930 as "saleslady, real estate," reflecting the decline of an active artistic class. A charming and insightful glimpse into an era, Dixie Bohemia describes the writers, artists, poseurs, and hangers-on in the New Orleans art scene of the 1920s and illuminates how this dazzling world faded as quickly as it began.

Genius of Place

Author : Max Putzel
Publisher : LSU Press
Page : 364 pages
File Size : 54,9 Mb
Release : 1985-01-01
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN : 0807112054

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Genius of Place by Max Putzel Pdf

Until recently most discussions of William Faulkner have centered exclusively on his novels. Yet no chronicle of Faulkner's Growth as a literary artist, perhaps America’s foremost in this century, can afford to overlook the years he spent struggling to establish himself as a writer of short stories. To trace in detail Faulkner's personal and artistic growth during the prolific years 1925-1931, when he was approaching artistic ripeness and earning belated recognition, has hitherto been impossible. There seemed to be no means of dating the innumerable drafts, the false starts and fumbling revisions, among the thousands of sheets left behind when he died in 1962. Max Putzel’s critical study of these crucial formative years fills this gap—assigning dates to the sketches and drafts of stories and relating them both to Faulkner’s jealously guarded private life and the several critical histories of the novels that have recently appeared. Putzel maintains there is a necessary, a “symbiotic” relation between the novels and the stories. He also finds that the short story form Faulkner found so hard to master liberated a lyrical power that had been stifled during his confused dilettante period as a poet in a provincial southern town. Yet his turbulent, ambivalent feelings about that town and its inhabitants were essential to his development, however slowly and reluctantly he surrendered to their benign influence—the genius of his homeplace. Faulkner also was sensitive to the monumental revolutionary changes, even the trivial fads and foibles, of his own time—the changes that swept the world outside of Oxford, Mississippi, after the Great War he so regretted having missed. Faulkner’s maturing vision of man, history, and class and caste relations was affected by Einstein’s theory of relativity, Freud’s probing into the hidden wellsprings of human behavior, Eliot’s borrowings from anthropology, Joyce’s new rhetoric, Diaghilev’s eclecticism, Picasso’s ventures in cubism and classicism---not to mention the Treaty of Versailles, Prohibition, jazz, free love, free spending, gang violence, false prosperity, the crash, and the depression. These factors also helped shape a style capable of evoking passion and tenderness, anger and laughter, and every intermediate shade of feeling---a style demanding the creative effort of readers. Genius of Place takes all this into account while seeking to determine what is likely to endure and reward future readers of works like “Carcassonne” and The Sound and the Fury, the Snopes trilogy and As I Lay Dying, “Dry September” and Sanctuary.

Grace King

Author : Robert B. Bush
Publisher : LSU Press
Page : 340 pages
File Size : 50,9 Mb
Release : 1999-03-01
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN : 0807124877

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Grace King by Robert B. Bush Pdf

The New Orleans writer Grace King was an intensely loyal daughter of the South. Fostered by bitter memories of the Civil War, her loyalty was kept burning by her family’s struggle to regain its wealth and maintain its social position during the long agony of Reconstruction. In Grace King: A Southern Destiny, Robert Bush tells of King’s life and her art, both of which she enthusiastically dedicated to the memory and welfare of her region, her city, and her family. When she began writing in 1886, it was out of a sense of anger at what she saw as George Washington Cable’s disloyalty to the South, his deliberately false portrayal of New Orleans’ Creoles and blacks. King was herself a conservative in racial matters, and a number of her stories celebrate the loyalty that she has observed freed slaves showing their former masters. But Grace King was far from conservative in her determination to earn money as a writer and to master the ideas of her era—neither endeavor considered a particularly appropriate ambition for a patrician woman of her time. She was proud to be able to contribute to her family’s income, and she developed a sharp eye for the fluctuations in the literary marketplace. In the late 1880s King worked in the local-color genre that was then in vogue. When the demand for that school of regional writing declined in the 1890s, she turned to the shorter “balcony stories” in which the details of local background were minimized. Then later in the decade, she focused her talents on writing Louisiana history after she found that publishers wanted the kind of sound, colorful work she was capable of producing. Grace King’s major accomplishments in fiction are a small number of first-rate stories and a quiet, realistic novel about New Orleans during Reconstruction—The Pleasant Ways of St. Médard. Her best historical work is New Orleans, the Place and the People. However the significance and fascination of her life lies not just in the pages of the books she wrote but also in her role as a literary champion of the South, carrying her determined views from New Orleans to New York, New England, Canada, England, and France.

New Orleans Sketches

Author : William Faulkner
Publisher : Univ. Press of Mississippi
Page : 174 pages
File Size : 55,9 Mb
Release : 2009-09-28
Category : Fiction
ISBN : 9781604734829

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New Orleans Sketches by William Faulkner Pdf

In 1925 William Faulkner began his professional writing career in earnest while living in the French Quarter of New Orleans. He had published a volume of poetry (The Marble Faun), had written a few book reviews, and had contributed sketches to the University of Mississippi student newspaper. He had served a stint in the Royal Canadian Air Corps and while working in a New Haven bookstore had become acquainted with the wife of the writer Sherwood Anderson. In his first six months in New Orleans, where the Andersons were living, Faulkner made his initial foray into serious fiction writing. Here in one volume are the pieces he wrote while in the French Quarter. These were published locally in the Times-Picayune and in the Double Dealer. The pieces in New Orleans Sketches broadcast seeds that would take root in later works. In their themes and motifs these sketches and stories foreshadow the intense personal vision and style that would characterize Faulkner’s mature fiction. As his sketches take on parallels with Christian liturgy and as they portray such characters as an idiot boy similar to Benjy Compson, they reveal evidence of his early literary sophistication. In praise of New Orleans Sketches, Alfred Kazin wrote in the New York Times Book Review that “the interesting thing for us now, who can see in this book the outline of the writer Faulkner was to become, is that before he had published his first novel he had already determined certain main themes in his work.” In his trailblazing introduction, Carvel Collins often called “Faulkner’s best-informed critic,” illuminates the period when the sketches were written as the time that Faulkner was making the transition from poet to novelist. “For the reader of Faulkner,” Paul Engle wrote in the Chicago Tribune, “the book is indispensable. Its brilliant introduction . . . is full both of helpful information . . . and of fine insights.” “We gain something more than a glimpse of the mind of a young genius asserting his power against a partially indifferent environment,” states the Book Exchange (London). “The long introduction . . . must rank as a major literary contribution to our knowledge of an outstanding writer: perhaps the greatest of our times.”

Faulkner's Geographies

Author : Jay Watson,Ann J. Abadie
Publisher : Univ. Press of Mississippi
Page : 208 pages
File Size : 44,6 Mb
Release : 2015-06-25
Category : Literary Criticism
ISBN : 9781496802286

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Faulkner's Geographies by Jay Watson,Ann J. Abadie Pdf

The recent spatial turn in social theory and cultural studies opens up exciting new possibilities for the study of William Faulkner's literature. The fictional domains of Yoknapatawpha County and Jefferson, Mississippi, are not simply imagined communities but imaginative geographies of remarkable complexity and detail, as evidenced by the maps Faulkner created of his "apocryphal" county. Exploring the diverse functions of space in Faulkner's artistic vision, the eleven essays in Faulkner's Geographies delve deep into Yoknapatawpha but also reach beyond it, to uncover unsuspected connections and flows linking local, regional, national, hemispheric, and global geographies in Faulkner's writings. Individual contributions examine the influence of the plantation as a land-use regime on Faulkner's imagination of north Mississippi's geography; the emergence of "micro-Souths" as a product of modern migratory patterns in the urban North of Faulkner's fiction; the enlistment of the author's work in the geopolitics of the cultural Cold War during the 1950s; the historical and literary affiliations between Faulkner's Deep South and Greater Mexico; the local and idiosyncratic as alternatives to region and nation; the unique intersection of regional and metropolitan geographies that Faulkner encountered as a novice writer immersed in the literary culture of New Orleans; the uses of feminist geography to trace the interplay of gender, space, and movement; and the circulation of Caribbean and "Black South" spaces and itineraries through Faulkner's masterpiece, Absalom, Absalom! By bringing new attention to the function of space, place, mapping, and movement in his literature, Faulkner's Geographies seeks to redraw the very boundaries of Faulkner studies.